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The Global Economy in July

July began with a scare of a potential selloff  in emerging market (EM) assets. This was triggered by talk of developed market Central Banks starting to end the era of monetary easing. Alongside the US Federal Reserve’s interest rate hikes and balance sheet unwinding, the Canadian central bank raised rates and the European Central Bank signaled willingness to consider changes to its bond buying program. However, the switch in market sentiment was short lived thanks to Fed Chairwoman Janet Yellen’s dovish statements in her testimony to the US Congress. The outflows reversed and the Institute of International Finance (IIF) reported $20 billion in portfolio inflows to EMs in July.

To some market commentators the episode of EM weakness signaled that international investors were ready to let go of their EM debt investments as soon as global markets wobble. This has prompted fund managers to be cautious of their investments especially in terms of market liquidity giving them space to exit. However, analysts saw the episode as a short period of time in which asset prices adjusted to reflect the hawkishness of developed market central banks.

While Emerging Markets were helped by a weakening US dollar, developed markets were helped by an improving Eurozone economy. In the IMF’s July World Economic Outlook report, it highlighted that global growth in 2017 was being driven by the EU alongside Japan and China. In the meantime it also downgraded US growth outlook slightly, citing the failure of the Trump administration to deliver on its promised fiscal stimulus. The IMF also indicated that the US dollar and British pound were overvalued, relative to fundamentals, while the euro, yen and yuan are seen as being in line with fundamentals.

Brent oil prices made gains in July and increased above the $50 mark reaching $52.65 on July 31st. This was largely driven by higher US demand and reductions in crude oil stockpiles in the US. It was also helped by outcomes of a meeting among major oil producers in St. Petersburg on the 24th, where Nigeria agreed to cap its output and Saudi indicated limits to their exports. But the gains were capped by high OPEC production, primarily due to Libyan and Nigerian output.

Source: Frontier Blog

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