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The Global Economy in October

October was marked by the implementation of a number of steps towards monetary policy normalization by major central banks and speculation on who President Trump would nominate as the Federal Reserve chairman. The month ended with markets pricing in the nomination of current Fed Governor Jerome Powell, which was confirmed on November 2nd ahead of Trump’s tour of Asia. Powell’s nomination is seen as marking the continuity of Yellen’s gradual rate hike policies and the possible relaxation of some US banking and financial regulations. In the meantime, progress on Trump’s promised tax reforms has increased the optimism for tax cuts happening in 2018 and boosting US growth. These factors helped push markets higher following the nomination.

The month saw the start of the Fed’s balance sheet shrinking process and further confirmation of a December rate hike as US economic data painted an optimistic picture even though inflation continued below the 2% target. The European Central Bank (ECB) cut its bond purchases by half to 30 billion euros on the 26th as expected, but its tone in doing so was very dovish. The ECB kept its options open by continuing the purchases till the end of September 2018 and stating that an extension beyond that is possible if needed.

Meanwhile, the Bank of England hiked interest rates by a quarter percentage point for the first time in a decade to 0.5%, despite weak economic growth in the UK. The Bank has a dovish outlook on future rate hikes and has retained its bond purchasing programs.

China’s Communist Party Congress also occurred in the month, where President Xi Jinping laid out his vision for China up to 2050. With the outgoing central bank governor warning about the level of debt, some are concerned, now that the congress is over, authorities will launch a concerted effort at deleveraging that could slow down the Chinese economy.

Emerging markets saw the return of political risk affecting performance during the month. This was mainly on the back of South Africa’s budget woes, Turkey’s diplomatic row with USA and Germany and Brazil’s tenuous politics. However, according to initial estimates, the Institute of International Finance (IIF) has recorded US$13.8bn in overall portfolio inflows to emerging markets in October. The moderation in inflows from previous months could also be due to rising US yields and a strengthening US dollar.

Brent crude oil prices continued to increase in the month passing the US$60 mark at the end of the month for the first time since July 2015. This was driven by continued optimism over the major oil producers seeking an extension to their production limitation beyond March 2018. Also helping the movement were geopolitical tensions, surprise drops in crude stockpiles and Chinese demand.

Source: Frontier Blog

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